Posts from August, 2013

Is your cat weird?

Pinky
swanky / Foter / CC BY-NC-SA

A Guthrie veterinarian discusses weird but normal cat behavior.

Ever wonder if your cat is weird?  I think I have most of you beat on this question as our clinic cat, Sylvie, sucks on the end of her tail.  In all likelihood, what you think is a strange behavior is probably normal in most cats.  Today, a Guthrie veterinarian will discuss some common normal behaviors in cats and explain why they do what they do.

Face rubbing is a sign of affection.  Cats have scent glands on the side of their face and the corner of their mouth.  When they rub their face on you or your furniture they are leaving their scent behind.  This scent has actually been synthetically reproduced by a company and is called Feliway.  It is used to alleviate anxiety and actually works very well in calming cats.  This Guthrie veterinarian uses Feliway in our feline only cat exam room and in the cat boarding room to calm our feline patients.

Cats are frequently caught drinking out of the toilet.  Cats like fresh water so they like drinking from the toilet bowl because the water is typically ‘fresher’ because it is changed with each flush.  Drinking toilet water is not dangerous unless you keep chemical cleaners in the tank.  If you don’t like you cat drinking from the toilet, then try getting a running water fountain for them to drink from.

Cats sleep a majority of the day.  This is actually a survival trait learned in the wild to conserve their energy for hunting.  Cats also tend to be more nocturnal because they have superior night vision which allows them to sneak up on their prey.  Their night vision is due to a layer of tissue in the back of the eye that reflects light back through the retina.  This extra layer of tissue is what causes their eyes to glow in the dark explains a Guthrie veterinarian.

What strange behavior does your cat do?

Dr. Anna was born and raised in Guthrie, Oklahoma.  As a teenager, Dr. Anna found her beloved pet dead on the side of the road left to die without any help.  That was the moment she decided to become a vet and vowed to help other people and their pets.  After a few years of practicing in New Hampshire, Dr. Anna became homesick and decided to return to Guthrie to be with her parents and five other siblings.  Family and friends are a major part of our lives which is why we treat our clients as family.  Dr. Anna and her husband do not have children but our very proud pet parents and therefore, treat every four legged friend as part of the family.  See more @ www.guthriepet.net

New scientific breakthrough in pet weight managament by a Guthrie vet clinic

New weight management options for pets by a Guthrie vet clinic.

Oliver After Weight Training
Mr. T in DC / Foter / CC BY-ND

A Guthrie vet clinic reveals a new scientific breakthrough in pet weight management.  The first step in a successful weight loss plan is knowing your pet’s ideal body weight and feeding thirty percent less calories than the amount required to maintain that ideal body weight.   The second step is a new revolutionary diet break-through from Hill’s Prescription Diet.

Hill’s and The University of Tennessee developed Healthy Weight Protocol which is a tool to determine the ideal body weight of an animal.  Prior to this, determining body condition in pets was very subjective.  This tool involves measuring certain areas of a pet’s body with a tape measure and entering the measurements into a calculator to determine what is the ideal body weight states a Guthrie vet clinic.

Hill’s has also formulated a new, revolutionary diet for dogs and cats called Metabolic Advanced Weight Solutions.  This diet works with each pet’s unique metabolic response to burn excess body fat.  It has been clinically proven to provide 28% weight loss in two months.  In fact, 88% of pets involved in a veterinarian supervised in-home study lost weight without strict protocols or precise measuring.

Contact a Guthrie vet clinic today about the Hill’s Healthy Weight Protocol.  It’s simple and only involves getting a current weight on your pet and a few easy measurements to end up with an accurate ideal weight and a customized feeding plan for lasting weight loss success.

Dr. Anna was born and raised in Guthrie, Oklahoma.  As a teenager, Dr. Anna found her beloved pet dead on the side of the road left to die without any help.  That was the moment she decided to become a vet and vowed to help other people and their pets.  After a few years of practicing in New Hampshire, Dr. Anna became homesick and decided to return to Guthrie to be with her parents and five other siblings.  Family and friends are a major part of our lives which is why we treat our clients as family.  Dr. Anna and her husband do not have children but our very proud pet parents and therefore, treat every four legged friend as part of the family.

Protect your pet from pet flipping from a Guthrie veterinary!

Guthrie veterinary says protect your pet with microchip.

Kobe
tbone_sandwich / Foter / CC BY-NC-SA

Have you heard of pet flipping?  Pet flipping is a new trend where people are stealing dogs and selling them on the internet or using them for breeding purposes.  Unfortunately, this has been reported around the country from pet owners and law enforcement officials.  You can protect your pet from this horrible ordeal by micro-chipping your pet and making sure your on-line contact information is correct.  Also, if you purchase a pet online a Guthrie veterinary recommends taking the pet to your veterinarian or an animal shelter to have it scanned for a microchip.  August 15th is National Check the Chip Day.

A Guthrie veterinary recommend every pet gets a microchip, even inside only animals.  This is especially important in areas where natural disasters can destroy homes and cause pet displacement.  Seventy four percent of micro-chipped animals are returned home where only thirteen percent of animals not micro-chipped are returned to their owners.

There are a few important facts to understand about microchips says a Guthrie veterinary.  A microchip is also not a GPS.  Currently, microchips do not store your contact information.  The microchip is just a number which is then used to trace back to you.  You MUST register your microchip and keep the contact information up to date!  Unfortunately, there are multiple microchip registries in the United States and they are not required to share owner information with each other.  However, you can register your microchip with multiple companies. To make it easier for veterinarians and pet owners to search the registries of most microchip manufacturers, AAHA maintains a web-based resource called the Universal Pet Microchip Lookup Tool.

Dr. Anna was born and raised in Guthrie, Oklahoma.  As a teenager, Dr. Anna found her beloved pet dead on the side of the road left to die without any help.  That was the moment she decided to become a vet and vowed to help other people and their pets.  After a few years of practicing in New Hampshire, Dr. Anna became homesick and decided to return to Guthrie to be with her parents and five other siblings.  Family and friends are a major part of our lives which is why we treat our clients as family.  Dr. Anna and her husband do not have children but our very proud pet parents and therefore, treat every four legged friend as part of the family.

A Guthrie veterinary clinic discusses proper pet etiquette

A Guthrie veterinary clinic gives advice on “petiquette”.

52/365 Whole Pack
carterse / Foter / CC BY-SA

Pet ownership has changed over the last 20 years.  Not only has the number of dogs and cats in the United States increased, but pets have moved their way into our homes and into our hearts.  Many people, including the team members of a Guthrie veterinary clinic, consider their pets their children and treat them as such.  It is important to be aware and sensitive to others people and animals around us when we have our pets out in public.  Here are some “petiquette” rules that you should follow to prevent insulting your human friends.

You should always ask permission to bring your pet to someone else’s home and only if your pet is well behaved.  If your pet is invited, ask how you can make the visit more comfortable for everyone.   Check to see if you need to keep your pet on a leash or if you need to bring a crate.  If you are staying overnight bring your dog’s bed, crate or blanket so you don’t get hair on your friend’s furniture.  Also be prepared to repair or replace anything that your pet damages or destroys advices a Guthrie veterinary clinic.

It’s important to make sure your pet gets proper exercise during your visit, especially for potty breaks.  Walk your pet close to the curb to encourage them to potty away from the sidewalk.  If your pet starts sniffing around someone’s personal property gently pull them away and redirect them to a different area.  Always scoop their poop.  If the stool is too soft to pick up, carry along a water bottle to rinse away the mess.  A Guthrie veterinary clinic recommends you bring along some odor neutralizer and stain remover just in case an accident occurs in the house.

Don’t assume that just because your dog loves every dog that another person’s dog feels the same way.  In certain situations, a dog that is normally nice can become aggressive.  Shy dogs that aren’t used to other dogs may bite due to fear.  Be respectful of other people’s personal space as many dogs love sniffing butts and crotches.  Not everyone understands that’s just how they say hello, it’s nice to meet you.  When approaching someone with a dog it’s always important to ask if you can pet their dog.  A Guthrie veterinary clinic recommends telling people that they are welcome to pet your dog because not everyone knows that is proper “petiquette”.

Dr. Anna was born and raised in Guthrie, Oklahoma.  As a teenager, Dr. Anna found her beloved pet dead on the side of the road left to die without any help.  That was the moment she decided to become a vet and vowed to help other people and their pets.  After a few years of practicing in New Hampshire, Dr. Anna became homesick and decided to return to Guthrie to be with her parents and five other siblings.  Family and friends are a major part of our lives which is why we treat our clients as family.  Dr. Anna and her husband do not have children but our very proud pet parents and therefore, treat every four legged friend as part of the family.

A Guthrie pet clinic reveals the secret to happiness.

Ms. Lucy
melgupta / Foter / CC BY-NC-ND

An inspiring video by Shawn Achor said that success does not equal happiness because as humans we are always striving to succeed.  He believes that happiness is all about how we process the world around us in our mind (positive, negative and neutral thinking).  He said that there are five things that we can do to increase our happiness.  These five things help release dopamine into our bloodstream which helps us to feel happier.  According to a Guthrie pet clinic, pets are always happy because they are always doing these five things.

Gratitude:  Our pets are always grateful for everything we give them in life!  No matter how many times we give them the same food or throw the same toy they are just as happy the first time we fed or played with them as the last.

Journaling:  Ok, our pets aren’t able to actually write down words on a piece of paper.  However, journaling is a form of mental stimulation and pets, if allowed and given the proper tools, long for mental stimulation.  A Guthrie pet clinic recommends mental stimulation by using interactive toys, obedience training and learning tricks.  Animals are very intelligent.

Exercise:  If allowed and given access, pets will choose to live very active life styles.  Those that don’t are usually not happy and have behavior problems such as excessive barking, chewing, and digging.  Our Guthrie pet clinic motto is a tired dog is a good dog!

Meditation:  How many times do you catch your pet just laying peacefully?  Many are content for hours just being who they are and enjoying the environment that is around them.

Random acts of kindness:  We have all heard heroic animal rescue stories, but all pets show random acts of kindness daily by giving us kisses, laying their heads on our laps, staying right by our side when we are sick and unconditional love no matter how they are treated.

A Guthrie pet clinic agrees that we can all learn something from animals. Shawn Achor is on the right track!  If you are interested watch his video.

Dr. Anna was born and raised in Guthrie, Oklahoma.  As a teenager, Dr. Anna found her beloved pet dead on the side of the road left to die without any help.  That was the moment she decided to become a vet and vowed to help other people and their pets.  After a few years of practicing in New Hampshire, Dr. Anna became homesick and decided to return to Guthrie to be with her parents and five other siblings.  Family and friends are a major part of our lives which is why we treat our clients as family.  Dr. Anna and her husband do not have children but our very proud pet parents and therefore, treat every four legged friend as part of the family.

A Guthrie vet discusses how to select pet food.

Twilight Werewolf Kibble Recipe Labels

A Guthrie vet discusses how to understand pet food nutritional statements and select a good pet food brand.

All pet food diets have to meet specific standards set up by the Association of American Feed Controls Officials (AAFCO) to be able to manufacture and sell within the United States.  A Guthrie vet says that all pet foods must be complete and balanced and it must specify for a life cycle the food is intended to be feed.  These two items and reading the AAFCO label are far more important than looking at the actual ingredients.  Ingredients are important but you must realize that not all ingredients can be utilized by pets as in people.

There are three ways for a diet to be declared complete and balanced.  Laboratory analysis on the actual pet food, a mathematical calculation based on nutritional information or a feeding trial where the food is fed to animals over a period of time.  Just because a diet has been formulated and says it is complete and balanced doesn’t guarantee that the pet is benefiting from the ingredients.  A Guthrie vet says the best foods to feed are foods that have been determined complete and balanced by a feeding trial!  The method of determination is always stated on the AAFCO statement which is somewhere on the bag.

The second important aspect is to determine which life cycle category is appropriate for your pet and to feed that type of food.  The four life stages that have been determined by AAFCO are adult (maintenance), growth (puppy/kitten), reproduction (pregnant animals) and all life stages.  There is no profile for senior or geriatric patients that has been determined by AAFCO.  Food that is labeled senior/geriatric is a gimmick used for marketing terms.  Many dog foods fall into the all life stages category, which means that it is appropriate for all stages.  These foods have to meet higher requirements in order to sustain the growing and pregnant animals and therefore contain more than needed for an adult animal.  A Guthrie vet says it’s better to tailor the food to each individual animal based on their actual life stage and feed for growth, maintenance or reproduction instead of all life stages.

Here are a few other facts by a Guthrie vet to keep in mind.  I know a lot of people switch brands of foods, so if you do this it is important to feed according to the guild lines on the bag of food because calorie content can vary 200-300 kcal/cup between different diets.  It’s best to feed according to the guild lines on the bag of food.  The amount listed is a range that is to be feed per day.  I also recommend staying away from pet foods containing dyes as these serve no nutritional value for your pet and only makes the product look more appealing to us fur parents. There is no documented health benefits to feeding a grain free diet.  Grain free does not mean that it is low in carbohydrates.  These diets are usually substituting a lower quality carbohydrate to meet energy requirements.  All natural is not the same as organic.  To be listed as organic there are very strict guild lines that have to be met.  There are over 50 dog and cat food products currently on recall lists, so please check the AVMA website for a current list of recalled products.  If you store your food in another container always keep the product code and lot number of the food for recall purposes.

Dr. Anna was born and raised in Guthrie, Oklahoma.  As a teenager, Dr. Anna found her beloved pet dead on the side of the road left to die without any help.  That was the moment she decided to become a vet and vowed to help other people and their pets.  After a few years of practicing in New Hampshire, Dr. Anna became homesick and decided to return to Guthrie to be with her parents and five other siblings.  Family and friends are a major part of our lives which is why we treat our clients as family.  Dr. Anna and her husband do not have children but our very proud pet parents and therefore, treat every four-legged friend as part of the family.

Allergies in pets by a vet in Guthrie

A vet in Guthrie discusses treatment for atopic dermatitis.

Ah.....
&y / Foter / CC BY-NC-SA

If your dog meets more than 5 of the following criteria it’s highly likely your dog has atopic dermatitis due to inhalant allergies:  Onset of itching occurs before 3 years of age, dog lives primarily inside, the itching responds to steroids, has chronic or reoccurring yeast infections, front feet are itchy, ear flaps are inflamed but the margins of the ears are not affected and is not itchy around the tail.  The good news is a vet in Guthrie can help you reverse the allergy rather than mask signs with steroids with a fairly new treatment.

Many of you are probably familiar with taking allergy injections for yourself or a family member to desensitize you to the allergy.  This treatment is the same concept but instead of having to give your pet a shot you give the medication orally.  Sublingual immunotherapy has been used a lot in Europe for treating people for allergies and a vet in Guthrie says it is just recently becoming available for treatment of animals in the United States.  The allergens that your pet is allergic to is formulated and administered in a metered pump dispenser that delivers drops into the mouth and is absorbed through the gums.

Currently this treatment is limited to environmental allergies and not food allergies.  However, this type of therapy has been used to successfully treat patients with peanut allergies which may be an indication that this may be useful for treating food allergies in pets in the future.  Interestingly, one study showed that 50% of dogs that failed allergy injection treatment responded to sublingual treatment.

I know it all sounds too good to be true but there are some disadvantages to this treatment.  The main disadvantage is that is does not work immediately (3-6 months) and sometimes doesn’t work at all.  A recent study showed a 60% response rate.  The other downfall with this product is that it requires long term (6-12 months) twice daily treatment where injections are typically given once weekly.  Feel free to contact a vet in Guthrie if you think your pet will benefit from this type of treatment.

Dr. Anna was born and raised in Guthrie, Oklahoma.  As a teenager, Dr. Anna found her beloved pet dead on the side of the road left to die without any help.  That was the moment she decided to become a vet and vowed to help other people and their pets.  After a few years of practicing in New Hampshire, Dr. Anna became homesick and decided to return to Guthrie to be with her parents and five other siblings.  Family and friends are a major part of our lives which is why we treat our clients as family.  Dr. Anna and her husband do not have children but our very proud pet parents and therefore, treat every four legged friend as part of the family.

Heat stroke in pets by a Guthrie animal hospital

A Guthrie animal hospital explains how to prevent heat stroke.

Cuidando o campo
Eduardo Amorim / Foter / CC BY-NC-SA

The sizzling days of summer have arrived and it’s important to protect your pet from the heat.  Heat stroke is a life threatening condition that requires immediate care at a Guthrie animal hospital.  Normal body temperature for dogs and cats is between 100 and 102 degrees Fahrenheit and anything over 105 degrees is considered a medical emergency.

Puppies, kittens, geriatric/senior pets along with breeds with short-noses, like Pugs and Bulldogs, are more prone to developing heat stroke.  Overweight pets and animals with heart or respiratory problems are also more susceptible to heat stroke.  A Guthrie animal hospital says that signs of heat stroke include excessive panting and salivation, high fever, rapid heartbeat, fatigue, collapse and seizures.

You can help prevent heat stroke by providing shade and plenty of clean water, avoiding excessive exercise and NEVER leaving your pet in a parked vehicle. “A study in 2005 at Stanford University School of Medicine found that when the temperature outside is between 72 and 96 degrees, the temperature inside a parked car, even with the windows open, goes up 40 degrees within the first hour.  A good rule of thumb to follow, if it is too hot outside for you it is too hot outside for your pet.

If you pet is exhibiting signs of heat stroke remove it from the environment to a shaded or cool area.  Begin to cool the body slowly by placing wet towels on the neck, armpits, and groin.  You can also wet the ear flaps and paws with cool water. Directing a fan at your pet will speed up the cooling process.  Do not use cold water or ice as this slows down the cooling process by causing superficial vessels to constrict which will actually hold the heat inside the pet’s body.  Transport your pet to your local Guthrie animal hospital. 

Dr. Anna was born and raised in Guthrie, Oklahoma.  As a teenager, Dr. Anna found her beloved pet dead on the side of the road left to die without any help.  That was the moment she decided to become a vet and vowed to help other people and their pets.  After a few years of practicing in New Hampshire, Dr. Anna became homesick and decided to return to Guthrie to be with her parents and five other siblings.  Family and friends are a major part of our lives which is why we treat our clients as family.  Dr. Anna and her husband do not have children but our very proud pet parents and therefore, treat every four legged friend as part of the family.

How to stop your dog from barking by Guthrie veterinarians

Guthrie veterinarians reveal how to stop barking.

Howl
CaptPiper / Foter / CC BY-NC

Barking is a natural instinct that dogs exhibit for many reasons.  Unfortunately, it also one of the most common complaints of dog owners and their neighbors.  Territorial protection, separation anxiety, anxiety, frustration and exposure to new or unusual sounds, sights or odors are the main reasons why dogs bark.  The question is how do you get your dog to stop barking?

Guthrie veterinarians state that the key to prevent barking is to properly socialize your puppy to as many new people, animals, situations and noises as possible during their socialization period (8-16 weeks of age).  Proper crate training will also aid in reducing anxiety when left alone.  Barking should only be allowed to alert owners and then be controlled and stopped.  Unfortunately, if you have an adult dog it’s going to take some behavior training and possibly some training devices to get your dog’s barking under control.

The key to training your dog to stop barking is to reward the behavior that you want (quiet) and not to give them any kind of attention when they are barking.  Most people unintentionally reward and reinforce their dog’s bad behavior by allowing the dog indoors, feeding, petting, praising, playing, giving a toy or yelling at the dog to quiet down.

Guthrie veterinarians recommend you teach your dog a “quiet” command by waiting until your dog is barking.  Place a tasty food treat by his nose which will cause most dogs to stop barking and sniff the treat.  Once they stop barking immediately say “quiet”, give the dog the treat and praise your dog.

There are some anti-barking devices available that work well for most dogs.  Guthrie veterinarians recommend these products if you dog is barking primarily when you are not at home.  These device ensure immediate and accurate timing by emitting a sound or smell that is unpleasant to the dog.  Barker breakers are battery operated devices which you can use inside your house or out in your yard that emit an ultrasonic sound when the dog barks.  There are also collars that emit citronella spray or air every time the dog barks.  If the underlying cause of the barking is anxiety these products are usually ineffective and the dog will bark until the battery is dead or the citronella can is empty.  Thundershirts or DAP collars would be more helpful for dogs with anxiety issues and can be purchased from Guthrie veterinarians.

Dr. Anna was born and raised in Guthrie, Oklahoma.  As a teenager, Dr. Anna found her beloved pet dead on the side of the road left to die without any help.  That was the moment she decided to become a vet and vowed to help other people and their pets.  After a few years of practicing in New Hampshire, Dr. Anna became homesick and decided to return to Guthrie to be with her parents and five other siblings.  Family and friends are a major part of our lives which is why we treat our clients as family.  Dr. Anna and her husband do not have children but our very proud pet parents and therefore, treat every four legged friend as part of the family.

Pregnant? Guthrie veterinary clinics tells what you need to know about Toxoplasmosis

What you need to know about Toxoplasmosis from Guthrie veterinary clinics.

Pregnant women infected with the Toxoplasma organism are prone to having miscarriages or babies born with birth defects.  Toxoplasma is a parasite that can infect all species of warm blooded animals.  Cats are the only species that allows the parasite to complete its entire life cycle and continue with its reproduction.  Contrary to popular believe cats don’t pose a huge risk of transmitting this disease to your unborn child states Guthrie veterinary clinics.

Toxoplasma infection is common it cats.  In fact, up to 50% of cats have antibodies indicating that they have been infected by this organism.  It is rare for cats to develop illness due to this parasite unless they become immune compromised.  In the United States, cats become infected with Toxoplasmosis by eating infected rodents.  Infection can also occur with all species by ingestion of infected raw meat.  Cats that test positive for antibodies to Toxoplasma do not have an active infection and do not pose a risk to pregnant females.  Cats will only shed the organism in there feces 3-10 days after eating an infected mouse.  In fact, shedding the organism is very rare and only occurs in 1 out of every 250 cats.

Guthrie veterinary clinics say that the most common way that people are infected with this organism is by eating raw or undercooked meat that contains the organism.  Proper cooking and or freezing of the meat for several days will kill the organism.  Less common ways to become infected include ingestion of raw, unpasteurized goat’s milk, ingestion through contaminated water or inhalation of the organism through infected soil or litter boxes.

Dr. Anna was born and raised in Guthrie, Oklahoma.  As a teenager, Dr. Anna found her beloved pet dead on the side of the road left to die without any help.  That was the moment she decided to become a vet and vowed to help other people and their pets.  After a few years of practicing in New Hampshire, Dr. Anna became homesick and decided to return to Guthrie to be with her parents and five other siblings.  Family and friends are a major part of our lives which is why we treat our clients as family.  Dr. Anna and her husband do not have children but our very proud pet parents and therefore, treat every four legged friend as part of the family.

border decoration
border decoration