Posts from July, 2014

Wordless Wednesday: What’s your diagnosis #20

Coccidia

A 12 week old puppy presents for bloody diarrhea.  The dog is not vomiting and eating.  Above is the microscopic view of the fecal float.  What’s your diagnosis and treatment?

Check back later in the week for the answer!  If you have an Ask Dr. Anna question you would like answered, please post them in the comment section. Stay up to date on all the latest by subscribing to my blog.  Also “like” me on Facebook.

Three wishes from your Guthrie veterinarian.

three wishes

Can you imagine be granted three wishes… but they had to be wishes that would change things related to your field of work?  Dr. Anna Coffin reveals what she would change in veterinary medicine if she were granted three wishes.

Wish #1:  I wish that finances did not have to play a role in treating pets.

  • Lack of finances can lead to no treatment at all, which increases the pet’s pain and suffering.
  • Lack of finances can lead to sub optimal care  
  • Lack of finances can lead to euthanasia

Most veterinarians are very generous with their time and money when it comes to treating pets, especially strays in need of help.  Guthrie Pet Hospital and its staff is no different.  Our Guthrie veterinary clinic has treated and adopted many pets over the last 17 years.  In fact, our clinic is very active in helping Friends of Guthrie Animals and all their efforts in helping pets in the Logan County area.  But, we must charge appropriately for our services so that we can pay our staff, pay our bills and continue treating not only your pet but those homeless pets in need as well.

Wish #2:  I wish clients would go to their veterinarian for expert advice for pet problems instead of other sources.

Sadly, the internet and breeders are probably the veterinarian’s number one competition when it comes to getting advice.  Veterinarians are the real experts because we have gone to school for 8 years to earn our degree.  We diagnose and treat patients that can’t tell us what is wrong.  Find a veterinarian that you trust and build a relationship with them and they will be available to you when a problem arises. [Tweet “Wish #2: I wish clients would go to their veterinarian for expert advice for pet problems instead of other sources.”]

Many veterinarians, like Dr. Anna Coffin are now branching out into social media and also blogging about pet healthcare, so if you must go onto the internet look for a trusted site for your information. 

Here are a few trusted sites I would recommend: 

Wish #3:  I wish clients would follow their veterinarian’s recommendations.

  • Following recommendations helps prevent diseases.
  • Following recommendations leads to speedy recoveries.
  • Following recommendations leads to decreased behavioral problems.

As a veterinarian, Dr. Coffin makes recommendations to patients because she believes that these recommendations will cause pets to live happier, healthier and longer lives.

If you have an Ask Dr. Anna question you would like answered, please post them in the comment section. Stay up to date on all the latest by subscribing to my blog.  Also “like” me on Facebook.

Dr. Anna was born and raised in Guthrie, Oklahoma. As a teenager, Dr. Anna found her beloved pet dead on the side of the road left to die without any help. That was the moment she decided to become a vet and vowed to help other people and their pets. After a few years of practicing in New Hampshire, Dr. Anna became homesick and decided to return to Guthrie to be with her parents and five other siblings. Family and friends are a major part of our lives which is why we treat our clients at Guthrie Pet Hospital as family.  Dr. Anna and her husband do not have children but are very proud pet parents and therefore, treat every four legged friend as part of the family.

Your pet’s behavior: normal or … a sign of illness?

pet's behavior

Did you know some of your pet’s behavior may be related to a hidden illness…and you may not even realize it?

Schedule your pet’s yearly exam today to discuss your pet’s behavior. Let’s check to make sure your pet is healthy!

  • Nipping
  • Scratching
  • Litter box issues
  • Leash pulling
  • Meowing at night
  • Urinating on the floor
  • Chewing shoes 

Are these behaviors just part of being a “normal” dog or cat, or not?

Actually, some common behavior issues are due to underlying medical problems. And
these illnesses are tough to recognize even for the most observant owners.  For example, your dog may urinate on your floor. It may be from excitement, but it also can be from a urinary tract infection. Your cat may stop jumping on your lap. Not because she’s being unfriendly, but because she has arthritis and jumping is too painful to her joints.

If these behaviors are left unchecked, it’s a triple issue:

  1. The behavior may worsen
  2. The underlying illness may progress (which puts your pet’s health at risk)
  3. Most importantly, your pet’s quality of life as part of your family is compromised

Here’s where we can help. Guthrie Pet Hospital has the expertise when it comes to analyzing, identifying and resolving behavior issues with your pet.

At your pet’s yearly checkup:
• If your dog is petrified of fireworks, the staff of Guthrie Pet Hospital can discuss desensitization techniques to give him relief.
• If your older cat is suddenly drinking a lot more water, Dr. Coffin’s comprehensive physical exam may reveal that your cat has an illness. We’ll run the right tests and prescribe medications if needed.
• Our Guthrie veterinary clinic can talk about your pet’s behavior. Some behavior issues are related to medical problems, but many just require new training strategies.

Either way, we can help fix those behaviors and give your pet a new leash on life!

Make an appointment for your pet’s annual exam today. We’ll check to make sure all of
your pet’s behaviors are appropriate and signs of good health. We are committed to
your pet’s well-being… all the way! Call us today!

I want to thank Partners for Healthy Pets for the content of this post.  They also have a great website to help pet owners in understanding the importance of yearly examinations.

If you have an Ask Dr. Anna question you would like answered, please post them in the comment section. Stay up to date on all the latest by subscribing to my blog.  Also “like” me on Facebook.

Dr. Anna was born and raised in Guthrie, Oklahoma. As a teenager, Dr. Anna found her beloved pet dead on the side of the road left to die without any help. That was the moment she decided to become a vet and vowed to help other people and their pets. After a few years of practicing in New Hampshire, Dr. Anna became homesick and decided to return to Guthrie to be with her parents and five other siblings. Family and friends are a major part of our lives which is why we treat our clients at Guthrie Pet Hospital as family.  Dr. Anna and her husband do not have children but are very proud pet parents and therefore, treat every four legged friend as part of the family.

Wordless Wednesday: What’s your diagnosis #19

Mast cell tumor

5 year old Terrier mix has a red, raised mass on his right side.  The mass has been there for about two weeks and has been increasing and decreasing in size over that time period.  The picture above is a fine needle aspirate of the mass viewed under a microscope.  What’s your diagnosis and treatment?

If you have an Ask Dr. Anna question you would like answered, please post them in the comment section. Stay up to date on all the latest by subscribing to my blog.  Also “like” me on Facebook.

Increase your pet’s longevity and love them longer #SomaPet

Longevity

Would you like to boost your pet’s immune and nervous system, promote healing, and increase vitality and longevity?  It’s now possible to do all these things with a daily supplement from SomaPet.

Thanks to Dr. Phillip White, who co-founded SomaLife, this amazing supplement is now available for the love and life of your pet! 

SomaPet origins:  Dr. White noticed that his German Shepherd, Rover, was struggling to get up the stairs.  He wondered if one of the SomaLife products developed for age management in people would help his beloved dog.  So he pulled apart six capsules and sprinkled it on his food.  Rover loved the taste and the results were quite amazing.  The health improvements occurred so quickly and so noticeably that he wanted other pet lovers to experience what he was.  Thus, the birth of SomaPet!

longevity

What is SomaPet:  SomaPet is an all-natural, vegan, whole food supplement specifically designed to deliver optimal nutritional support to your pet.  It is sugar free, fat free, gluten free and contains no additives, fillers or preservatives.  It contains a unique combination of eight amino acids that are designed to work together to improve the health and energy of your pet.  SomaPet is in a powder form that is easily mixed with your pet’s usual diet.

Amino acids are the building blocks of protein and constitute an essential part of an animal’s diet.  SomaPet is a specific combination of these 8 amino acids:[Tweet “Amino acids are the building blocks of protein and constitute an essential part of an animal’s diet. #SomaPet “]

How it works:  Growth hormone plays a major roll in cellular repair and regeneration.  Unfortunately, after an animal matures, there is a noticeable decline in production of growth hormone.  This specific combination of amino acids works to activate the pituitary gland’s release of growth hormone, and when taken orally your aging pet can benefit from the effects of growth hormone.

Benefits: 
STRENGTHENS Collagen & Bones!
• IMPROVES Immune System!
• RENEWS Vitality!
• REDUCES Body Fat!
• HEALTHIER Skin & Coat

For the Love and Live of your pet try #SomaPet

Dr. Anna’s Testimonial:

I started my 8 year old, weimaraner, Jade, on SomaPet about 2 weeks ago.  I just sprinkle it Food SomaPetover her food and give it a little toss.  She loves food and has always been an chow hound but she she is even more excited at meal times now more than ever.  She is a healthy, active girl so I really didn’t expect to see much of a change with her vitality.  However, I have noticed that her hair coat is shinier, softer and she is definitely shedding less.  I have also noticed she doesn’t seem to have a “doggie odor” like she used to before starting the supplement.  I expect to continue to see positive effects from this SomaPet product.

This post is sponsored by SomaPet and the Blog Paws Professional Pet Blogger Network. I am being compensated for helping spread the word about SomaPet, but Dr.Anna only shares information she feels is relevant to our readers. SomaPet is not responsible for the content of this article.

If you have an Ask Dr. Anna question you would like answered, please post them in the comment section. Stay up to date on all the latest by subscribing to my blog.  Also “like” me on Facebook.

Dr. Anna was born and raised in Guthrie, Oklahoma. As a teenager, Dr. Anna found her beloved pet dead on the side of the road left to die without any help. That was the moment she decided to become a vet and vowed to help other people and their pets. After a few years of practicing in New Hampshire, Dr. Anna became homesick and decided to return to Guthrie to be with her parents and five other siblings. Family and friends are a major part of our lives which is why we treat our clients at Guthrie Pet Hospital as family.  Dr. Anna and her husband do not have children but are very proud pet parents and therefore, treat every four legged friend as part of the family.

Wordless Wednesday: What’s your diagnosis #18

eosinophili plaque

This skin condition can appear in 3 different forms in cats.  The most common form of this disease appears as an ulcer on the upper lip.  What’s your diagnosis and treatment?

If you have an Ask Dr. Anna question you would like answered, please post them in the comment section. Stay up to date on all the latest by subscribing to my blog.  Also “like” me on Facebook.

Wordless Wednesday: What’s your diagnosis # 17

dentigerous cyst

This is two different x-ray views of the same tooth in an adult dog.  The tooth that is visible within the circled area was not visible on oral exam and there was a slight bulge in that area.  What’s your diagnosis and treatment?

If you have an Ask Dr. Anna question you would like answered, please post them in the comment section. Stay up to date on all the latest by subscribing to my blog.  Also “like” me on Facebook.

Chicken jerky treats still causing illness in dogs.

chicken jerky

PetCo and PetSmart are finally taking Jerky treats made in China off their shelves.  Dr. Coffin says… It’s about time!  Here is an update on the FDA’s investigation.

Chicken, duck and sweet potato jerky treats imported from China have been making pets ill since 2012.  If you are feeding your dog this type of product please make sure it is made in the United States![Tweet “Chicken jerky treats still causing illness in dogs. Buy made in USA!”]

Case numbers:  As of May 1, 2014

  • Total of 4,800 complaints of illness
  • These complaints have affected 5,600 dogs, 24 cats and 3 people
  • More than 1,000 dogs have died

Symptoms:

  • 60% of the cases reported gastrointestinal/liver disease
  • 30%$ of the cases reported kidney or urinary disease
  • 10% of the cases include neurologic, dermatologic or immunologic symptoms

Testing:

  • Low levels of antibiotics were detected in 2012
  • Some samples that were sold over a year ago contained a human anti-viral drug
  • Neither one of these substances should be present in these products but the FDA does not believe that these drugs are contributing to the illness reported.
  • FDA continues to devote significant resources to this investigation.

If your pet has experienced signs of illness that you suspect is related to jerky pet treats, please report it to FDA. While FDA does not necessarily respond to every individual complaint submitted, each report is valuable and becomes part of the body of knowledge that helps to inform our investigation.

If you have an Ask Dr. Anna question you would like answered, please post them in the comment section.  Stay up to date on all the latest by subscribing to my blog.  Also “like” me on Facebook.

Dr. Anna was born and raised in Guthrie, Oklahoma. As a teenager, Dr. Anna found her beloved pet dead on the side of the road left to die without any help. That was the moment she decided to become a vet and vowed to help other people and their pets. After a few years of practicing in New Hampshire, Dr. Anna became homesick and decided to return to Guthrie to be with her parents and five other siblings. Family and friends are a major part of our lives which is why we treat our clients at Guthrie Pet Hospital as family.  Dr. Anna and her husband do not have children but are very proud pet parents and therefore, treat every four legged friend as part of the family. 

10 Tips to Protect Pets on Fourth of July

4th Of July

Studies show that July 5th is the busiest day for animal shelters due to the number of pets that show up that panicked at the noise of firecrackers that fled into the night or that are lost. Veterinarians also experience more visits with scared, injured or in some cases killed pets as a result of the holiday and good intentions.

Unlike people, pets don’t associate the noise, flashes, and burning smell of pyrotechnics with celebrations. Pets are terrified of fireworks, and often panic at the loud whizzes and bangs they produce.

1. Keep your Pet Indoors at All Times
If your pet is used to being outside, the resulting panic caused by fireworks or other loud noises may make them break their restraint or jump a fence in a terrified attempt to find safety. Bring all pets indoors until the fireworks and parties are over.
2. Use only Pet Specific Insect Repellant
The same tip applies to applying “people” sunscreen on your pet. What isn’t toxic to humans can be toxic to animals. The ASPCA lists the poisonous effects of sunscreen on your pet as, “…drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, excessive thirst and lethargy.” DEET, a common insecticide, may cause neurological issues.
3. Alcoholic Drinks Poison Pets
Any alcohol can cause your pet to become dangerously intoxicated, go into a coma, or in severe cases, die from respiratory failure. Even beer is toxic; fermented hops and ethanol are poisonous to dogs, cats and birds.
4. Do not take pets to Fireworks Displays.
The safest place for your pet is at home, not in a crowded, unfamiliar and noisy place. The combination of too many people and loud fireworks will make your beloved pet freak out and desperately seek shelter. Locking them in the car is also not an option; your pet may suffer brain damage and heat stroke.
5. Have Your Pet Properly Identified
Your pet may break loose and become lost. Make sure they have proper identification such as a microchip or ID tags with their name and your phone number, or both. It is also a good idea to have a recent picture of your pets in case you have to put up signs.
6. No Glow Sticks
Avoid the cute ‘glow in the dark’ wands sticks around pets. Pets may chew them and the ASPCA states that while not highly toxic, “excessive drooling and gastrointestinal irritation could still result from ingestions, and intestinal blockage could occur from swallowing large pieces of the plastic containers.”
7. Never use Fireworks around Pets
While lit fireworks can pose a danger to curious pets and potentially result in severe burns and/or trauma to the face and paws, even unused fireworks can be hazardous. Some fireworks contain potentially toxic substances such as arsenic, potassium nitrate, and other heavy metals.
8. Don’t Give Your Pet “Table Food” from your Picnic
If you are having a backyard barbeque, you may be tempted to slip some snacks to your pet. But like beer and chocolate, there are other festive foods that could harm your pet. Onions, coffee, avocado, grapes & raisins, salt and yeast dough are all possible hazards for dogs and cats.
9. Lighter Fluid and Matches Are Harmful to Pets.
The ASPCA lists chlorates as a harmful chemical substance found in some matches that, if ingested, can cause your pet difficulty in breathing, damage blood cells or even cause kidney disease. If exposed to lighter fluid, your pet may sustain skin irritation on contact, respiratory problems if inhaled, and gastric problems if ingested.
10. Citronella Insect Control Products Harm Pets, Too.
Oils, candles, insect coils and other citronella-based repellants are irritating toxins to pets, according to the ASPCA. The result of inhalation can cause severe respiratory illnesses such as pneumonia, and ingestion can harm your pet’s nervous system.

The best thing for your pets is to exclude them from all festivities. Find a safe and secure spot inside the home or garage, giving them plenty of water. Make sure all doors and escape routes are secure. Your pets will appreciate the quiet and you can enjoy the fireworks knowing your pet is safe at home.

Thanks again to Veterinary Education Network (VEN) for this great content.  Wishing you and your family and safe and happy Independence Day!

border decoration
border decoration