Posts from August, 2014

Wordless Wednesday: What’s your diagnosis #24

hydronephrosis

This is an x-ray of a Whippet’s abdomen.  The dog came in for dental cleaning and a mass was felt on abdominal palpation (white arrow is pointing at the mass).  The dog was acting normal, however, the owner mentioned that the dog had gotten into a fight with a squirrel a few days ago and had taken a tumble.  Bite wounds were also visible on her face.  What’s your diagnosis and treatment?

Check back later in the week for the answer!  If you have an Ask Dr. Anna question you would like answered, please post them in the comment section. Stay up to date on all the latest by subscribing to my blog.  Also “like” me on Facebook.

Does your pet have skin growths?

skin growths

According to Veterinary Pet Insurance’s Top 10 most common causes of Veterinary visits in 2013, non-cancerous skin growths made number 3 on the list in dogs.  In fact, VPI goes on to say that non-cancerous skin growths were the most expensive condition on the list, costing an average of $342 per pet.

Dr. Anna Coffin says the first step is identifying skin growths on your pet.  Any lump or bump that you find on your pet’s skin is abnormal and should be seen by a Guthrie veterinarian if it persists for more than one week.  Skin growths that change rapidly in size, shape or color should be seen as soon as possible. [Tweet “Skin growths that change rapidly in size, shape or color should be seen as soon as possible. “]

Once our clients have identified skin growths on their pet, there are several things that will occur at our Guthrie veterinary clinic to diagnose the skin growths.  A full comprehensive exam will be performed, checking out every major system on your pet’s body.  While looking at the growth is the reason for your visit, looking at the whole body will help us determine if there are more lesions or if there is lymph node enlargement.  During the visit, it is also important to note where the skin growths are located and its size.  This allows us to determine any change in the skin growths at a later time.

Many veterinarians can make an educated guess on what the skin growths are based on the look and feel of the mass.  However, there are only 2 ways to actually diagnose what it is:

Fine needle aspirate:  This test requires taking a small diameter needle and sticking the mass several times.  The tissue that is obtained within the needle is then blown out onto a slide, stained and viewed under the microscope.  skin growths

  • non-invasive
  • inexpensive
  • test can be performed in the exam room
  • no anesthesia required
  • test results received the same day or next day*
  • can occasionally be inconclusive due to small sample size

*Dr. Anna Coffin and most general practitioners are able to identify the most common types of skin growths, but occasionally they may need to send the slide to the lab for review by a clinical pathologist.

Histopathology:  This is a test performed by on outside laboratory on a larger sample size of the skin growths.  The entire mass can be removed or a biopsy of the mass can be sent to the pathologist for review. 

  • more invasive
  • more expensive
  • needs to be performed in surgery
  • requires anesthesia
  • test results received in 5-7 days

If your pet has a mass, it really is best to have your veterinarian perform one of these test.  Don’t be afraid to ask your veterinarian to do these test because appropriate treatment and improved outcome should be based on a definitive diagnosis.

If you have an Ask Dr. Anna question you would like answered, please post them in the comment section. Stay up to date on all the latest by subscribing to my blog.  Also “like” me on Facebook.

Dr. Anna was born and raised in Guthrie, Oklahoma. As a teenager, Dr. Anna found her beloved pet dead on the side of the road left to die without any help. That was the moment she decided to become a vet and vowed to help other people and their pets. After a few years of practicing in New Hampshire, Dr. Anna became homesick and decided to return to Guthrie to be with her parents and five other siblings. Family and friends are a major part of our lives which is why we treat our clients at Guthrie Pet Hospital as family.  Dr. Anna and her husband do not have children but are very proud pet parents and therefore, treat every four legged friend as part of the family.

Wordless Wednesday: What’s your diagnosis #23

cat vs pit bull collage

This is an x-ray of a cat that was attacked by a pit bull.  The arrows point to areas that are injured.  What’s your diagnosis and treatment?

Check back later in the week for the answer!  If you have an Ask Dr. Anna question you would like answered, please post them in the comment section. Stay up to date on all the latest by subscribing to my blog.  Also “like” me on Facebook.

Wordless Wednesday: What’s your diagnosis #22

Foreign body abscess collage

This 1 year old Labrador Retriever presented to me for a 2nd opinion.  The dog was seen by another veterinarian 6 months ago for a smaller swelling on neck.  Veterinarian tapped the mass and removed pus.  Initially the swelling went down but it never completely went away.  The dog has been off and on antibiotics for about 6 months.  Swelling is getting larger and dog is not eating well.  What’s your diagnosis and treatment?

Check back later in the week for the answer!  If you have an Ask Dr. Anna question you would like answered, please post them in the comment section. Stay up to date on all the latest by subscribing to my blog.  Also “like” me on Facebook.

Wordless Wednesday: What’s your diagnosis #21

y/d

What disease does this cat food treat?  What are the symptoms of this disease?

Check back later in the week for the answer!  If you have an Ask Dr. Anna question you would like answered, please post them in the comment section. Stay up to date on all the latest by subscribing to my blog.  Also “like” me on Facebook.

Wordless Wednesday: What’s your diagnosis #21

y/d

What disease does this cat food treat?  What are the symptoms of this disease?

Check back later in the week for the answer!  If you have an Ask Dr. Anna question you would like answered, please post them in the comment section. Stay up to date on all the latest by subscribing to my blog.  Also “like” me on Facebook.

Stop Bobcat fever in its tracks #Seresto

Bobcat fever

Bobcat fever is a tick transmitted disease that is highly fatal to domestic cats.  Dr. Anna Coffin and the staff at Guthrie Pet Hospital diagnose several cases of this disease every year.  Learn more about Bobcat fever and how to stop it dead in its tracts with Seresto collar.[Tweet “Bobcat fever is a tick transmitted disease that is highly fatal to domestic cats.”]

Cytauxzoon felis is the tick transmitted organism that causes the illness Cytauzoonosis, also bobcat feverknown as bobcat fever.  Bobcats are the main host and reservoir of this organism.  The Lone Star Tick and the American Dog Tick transmit the disease to cats.  These ticks will feed on an infected bobcat and then will transmit the organism to a domestic cat during its next feeding.

Cats with bobcat fever may present with high fever, difficulty breathing, depression, dehydration, anorexia, anemia, and jaundice that often rapidly progresses to below normal body temperature, recumbency, coma, and death.  Even with aggressive supportive care, death rate is greater than 50% and typically occurs within one week of the cat developing symptoms.  For more information on this disease and other parasites visit the Companion Animal Parasite Council.

The best way to protect your cat from this disease is strict adherence to routine applications of products that kill ticks.  Dr. Coffin’s recommends the Seresto Collar by Bayer for 2 reasons:

  1. There is no need to remember monthly applications and it provides a reliable 8 months’ worth of protection
  2. It’s one of the few products available that actually repels and kills ticks.  If the tick doesn’t attach, then it can’t transmit these deadly disease.

bobcat fever

If your cat is not used to collars, please carefully observe your cat when it’s wearing a collar the first few days, especially when the cat is not used to having a collar around its neck.  Make sure the Seresto collar fits securely but not too tightly.  As a general guide, it should be possible to insert two fingers between the collar and the neck.  It’s also important to make sure that the collar is not loose enough for a cat to put its leg through.

This post is sponsored by Bayer / Seresto and the Pet Blogger Network. Dr. Anna is being compensated for helping spread the word about the Seresto product, but Dr. Anna only shares information she feels is relevant to our readers. Bayer / Seresto is not responsible for the content of this article.

If you have an Ask Dr. Anna question you would like answered, please post them in the comment section. Stay up to date on all the latest by subscribing to my blog.  Also “like” me on Facebook.

Dr. Anna was born and raised in Guthrie, Oklahoma. As a teenager, Dr. Anna found her beloved pet dead on the side of the road left to die without any help. That was the moment she decided to become a vet and vowed to help other people and their pets. After a few years of practicing in New Hampshire, Dr. Anna became homesick and decided to return to Guthrie to be with her parents and five other siblings. Family and friends are a major part of our lives which is why we treat our clients at Guthrie Pet Hospital as family.  Dr. Anna and her husband do not have children but are very proud pet parents and therefore, treat every four legged friend as part of the family.

Photo:  Flickr dbarronoss

dbarronoss

Milkotein dog treats a healthy, enjoyable new alternative.

dog treats

Paras Pets LLC is proud to introduce the first of a kind dog treat, Milkotein™, with the highest protein content.  Dr. Anna Coffin and her fur babies give their paw of approval on these new dog treats!

dog treats

What is Milkotein

Paras Pets LLC uses the freshest milk from local farmers.  This milk is pasteurized and coagulated into curds and then washed.  These solid masses of milk protein are then cut into 5 different sizes and dried.  Milkotein is the first of its kind dog treats with the highest protein content.  Milk + Protein = Milkotein!  In addition to a high quality, highly digestible milk protein, Milkotein is:

  • Low fatdog treats
  • Low calorie
  • No preservatives
  • No artificial colors
  • No artificial flavors
  • No binding agents
  • Soy free
  • Gluten free
  • Grain free
  • All natural:  It’s made of milk and lime juice only!

A safe treat alternative for these medical conditions:

1.  Obesity:  Unlike many other dog treats, Milkotein dog treats are a low-fat, low-calorie treat that has a high protein content.  It’s also a long-lasting treat that will keep your dog occupied for several days.

2.  Food Allergies:  This product is made only of milk and lime juice!  Most food allergies are due to grains or meat proteins so this is a great alternative to your typical treat.  In fact, treats for dogs with food allergies are few and far between.

3.  Dental disease:  Milkotein is a hard, long-lasting bar that softens with licking and chewing.  The hard texture of these dog treats helps to remove plague and tartar that builds up on your pet’s teeth.  Dr. Anna Coffin prefers these over bones because they are digestible.  (Because it is a hard bar, there is a chance of breaking or chipping a tooth.)

Because these dog treats are high in protein, Dr. Anna Coffin does not recommend giving this product to dogs with kidney disease.  However, Dr. Anna says that a high protein diet will not cause kidney disease to develop.

Dr. Anna Coffin’s reviewdog treats

I have 3 Weimaraners and a 10# terrier mix seen in this photo.  They all love to chew and it’s difficult to find something besides bones that they can’t destroy.    As you can tell from the photos, they loved Milkotein dog treats!  I got one massive and one heavy bar and they lasted for about 5 days which is pretty rare around my house.  When it got too small, I popped it in the microwave, allowed it to cool and then offered it to the dogs.  (This is my favorite feature of this product.) 

Dr. Anna Coffin recommends this great product.  Not only will it provide hours of entertainment for your dog but it’s a great alternative treat for several medical conditions.  Try it out now!  Milkotein online store

This post is sponsored by Paras Pets LLC. Dr. Anna is being compensated for helping spread the word about the Milkotein dog treats product, but Dr. Anna only shares information she feels is relevant to our readers. Paras Pets LLC is not responsible for the content of this article.

If you have an Ask Dr. Anna question you would like answered, please post them in the comment section. Stay up to date on all the latest by subscribing to my blog.  Also “like” me on Facebook.

Dr. Anna was born and raised in Guthrie, Oklahoma. As a teenager, Dr. Anna found her beloved pet dead on the side of the road left to die without any help. That was the moment she decided to become a vet and vowed to help other people and their pets. After a few years of practicing in New Hampshire, Dr. Anna became homesick and decided to return to Guthrie to be with her parents and five other siblings. Family and friends are a major part of our lives which is why we treat our clients at Guthrie Pet Hospital as family.  Dr. Anna and her husband do not have children but are very proud pet parents and therefore, treat every four legged friend as part of the family.

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