Posts from May, 2015

What’s your diagnosis #37

Floyd beforeafter x-ray

 This is a before and after x-ray of my dog Floyd.  He is a one-year-old Boxer/Pit mix.  He has severe hip dysplasia on both sides, but the right is worse than the left.  He has been limping on his right hind leg for several weeks.  What surgery did he have performed?

Check back later in the week for the answer!  If you have an Ask Dr. Anna question you would like answered, please post them in the comment section. Stay up to date on all the latest by subscribing to my blog.  Also “like” me on Facebook

Flea treatment: Benefits of oral flea treatments

Flea treatment

Fleas have been around for thousands of years.  Until recently, topical products were the treatment of choice.  We now have a great arsenal of effective oral flea treatments to kill and prevent infestations.  Dr. Anna Coffin will describe these new oral flea treatments and why they are better than topical treatments.[Tweet “We now have a great arsenal of effective oral flea treatment”]

Capstar:  This flea treatment is a tablet that starts killing fleas in 30 minutes, and all fleas will be dead within 4 hours.  It is safe for puppies and kittens four weeks and older.  However, animals must weigh over two pounds.  Capstar is also safe for pregnant or nursing animals.  It must be given daily.

Comfortis:  This flea treatment is a chewable, flavored tablet that starts killing fleas in 30 minutes, and all fleas will be dead within four hours.  It is safe for puppies and kittens fourteen weeks and older.  Puppies must weigh more than three pounds, and kittens must weight more than two pounds.  No studies have been performed on the safety in pregnant and nursing animals.  Comfortis should be used with caution in animals with seizures.  Comfortis works for a full thirty days.

Nexgard:  This flea treatment is a chewable treat that kills 100% of fleas and ticks within 24 hours.  It is safe for puppies six weeks and older and weighing more than four pounds.  No studies have been performed on the safety in pregnant and nursing animals.  If your dog has a history of seizures, use with caution. Nexgard works for a full thirty days.  This product is not approved for use in cats.

Bravecto:  This flea treatment is a chewable treat that starts killing fleas in two hours and ticks in twelve hours.  It is safe for puppies six months and older and weighing more than four pounds.  It is safe for pregnant and nursing animals.  Bravecto works for three months.  This product is not approved for use in cats.

Benefits of oral flea treatment:

  1. More effective:  Oral flea treatment is almost 100% effective while topical products are only about 88% effective
  2. No messy residue
  3. Convenient:  These oral medications are easy to give flavored tablets or treats.
  4. Don’t have to worry about bathing or getting wet:  Bathing or getting wet decrease the effectiveness of topical medication but not oral flea treatments.

If you have an Ask Dr. Anna question you would like answered, please post them in the comment section. Stay up to date on all the latest by subscribing to my blog.  Also “like” me on Facebook.

Dr. Anna was born and raised in Guthrie, Oklahoma. As a teenager, Dr. Anna found her beloved pet dead on the side of the road left to die without any help. That was the moment she decided to become a vet and vowed to help other people and their pets. After a few years of practicing in New Hampshire, Dr. Anna became homesick and decided to return to Guthrie to be with her parents and five other siblings. Family and friends are a major part of our lives which is why we treat our clients at Guthrie Pet Hospital as family.  Dr. Anna and her husband do not have children but are very proud pet parents and, therefore, treat every four-legged friend as part of the family.

What’s your diagnosis #36

Pregnant cat with fractured back

This is an abdominal x-ray of an adult cat.  The cat had kittens about three weeks ago and was just attacked by a pack of dogs.  The cat presented on its side and bleeding from the vaginal area.  What’s your diagnosis?

Check back later in the week for the answer!  If you have an Ask Dr. Anna question you would like answered, please post them in the comment section. Stay up to date on all the latest by subscribing to my blog.  Also “like” me on Facebook

7 steps to dog bite prevention & responsible dog ownership.

bite

In our society, where dogs are such a huge part of our lives, we hear stories every day of people who are bitten by family pets. As dog owners, it is our responsibility to keep our dogs, our families, and the public safe. We have to set up our dogs for success. Stefani Fortney lists 7 steps to dog bite prevention and responsible dog ownership.

1.  Educate! Teach your family members—including children—the proper way to interact with Fido. Every person in your household should treat him with respect. Also, learn how to recognize signs of fear, anxiety, and annoyance in your pup’s body language. Realizing when your dog needs space is the first step in avoiding a bite.

2.  Accept! Never assume that your dog won’t bite. Any dog can and will bite if pushed to the point of thinking it’s their only means of defense. Regardless of size, age, or temperament—ANY DOG CAN BITE.

3.   Observe! Know your dog’s fears, pet peeves, and anxieties… and respect them. Don’t put your dog into a situation where he feels the need to protect himself. If Rover is scared of toddlers, don’t take him to the family reunion. If Fluffy gets uptight in crowds, leave her at home when you go to the parade. Not every dog should be put into every social situation.

4.  Train! Your dog will be less likely to bite out of frustration or uncertainty if he has a solid foundation of basic obedience training. It establishes a relationship of trust between you and your dog—and will help to set boundaries for your canine companion.

5.  Contain! It’s your job as his owner to keep your dog safely in a fence or on a leash. Dogs who roam at-large are much more likely to be involved in a bite incident. It’s your responsibility to keep your dog under control and out of trouble.

6.  Speak up! If your dog is out with you on a walk or a trip to the vet, let people know that they need to respect his space. If a child runs up to your pup, step between them. Explain that it’s rude to run up to someone you don’t know. If an adult starts to reach for your scared canine, tell them to stop. Explain that your dog is uncomfortable. Don’t be shy. Your dog depends on you.

7.   Fly your flag! The Yellow Dog Project is a movement to help reduce dog bites in public by tying a yellow ribbon to your dog’s leash if they need extra space. Whether your dog is anxious, aggressive, sick, old, shy… or any other reason. The yellow ribbon signifies that people need to give your fur baby some space.

Remember—it is your responsibility to prevent your dog from biting.[Tweet “Remember—it is your responsibility to prevent your dog from biting.”]

IMG_3574zStefani Fortney has loved dogs for as long as long as she can remember. At the age of nine, she and her little Beagle mix, Puppy, learned obedience together for the first time in 4-H. As an adult, Stefani became a professional groomer, then later earned her accreditation (ABCDT) as a dog trainer from Animal Behavior College. She uses Positive Reinforcement training techniques exclusively. Stefani currently shares her home with her wife (Melissa), six dogs (Phaedra, Spectre, Mani, Fritter, Poppy, and Opus), and one cat (Pudge).

What’s your diagnosis #35

femoral head Skitch

 This is an x-ray of an eight-month-old rat terrier.  The dog has been limping on its right hind leg for several weeks.  The dog is progressively getting worse and is not bearing weight on its leg now.  The arrow is pointing to the lesion.  What’s your diagnosis?

Check back later in the week for the answer!  If you have an Ask Dr. Anna question you would like answered, please post them in the comment section. Stay up to date on all the latest by subscribing to my blog.  Also “like” me on Facebook

Real life stories of health and wellness #PerfectWeight

health and wellness

This week Dr. Anna Coffin is highlighting the real life story of Miley.  See the amazing results of her 10 Week Turnaround Challenge.  Learn some tips and tricks to succeeding at health and wellness in your pet and enter the 10 Week Turnaround Sweepstake!

This post is sponsored by Hill’s. Dr. Anna is being compensated for helping spread the word about Hill’s® Science Diet® Perfect Weight 10 Week Turnaround, but Dr. Anna only shares information she feels is relevant to our readers. Hill’s Pet Nutrition, Inc. is not responsible for the content of this article.health and wellness

Miley is a Golden Retriever who started the 10 Week Turnaround Challenge weighing 90 pounds.  With the proper diet, routine, and consistency Miley lost a total of 5 pounds!  Read more about Miley’s journey or watch this short video.

Health and wellness

Dr. Anna followed a group of 8 bloggers that started their pets on the 10 Week Turnaround Challenge.  100% of the pets lost some weight by the end of the 10 weeks and so can your pet!  You too can achieve health and wellness for your pet with the help of Hill’s® Science Diet® Perfect Weight and the 10 Week Turnaround Challenge.

Our pets aren’t in the shape they used to be and it’s time we did something about it.  If your pet’s health and wellness are important to you, then follow these tips:

  1. Make a change in your pet’s diet and make sure you are feeding the proper amount so your pet can be successful at losing weight.  70% of pets lose weight within 10 weeks with Hill’s Science Diet Perfect Weight for dogs and cats.health and wellness
  2. Create a routine for health and wellness.  Read Dr. Anna’s blog:  Create a routine so your pet can achieve a perfect weight. 
  3. Be consistent.  Read Dr. Anna’s blog:  Consistency is key to pet weight loss
  4. Take is slow.  This is not a fad diet or a race.  Download the 10 Week Turnaround Calendar to help stay on track.
  5. Enter 10 Week Turnaround Sweepstakes for your chance to win a 10-week supply of Science Diet Perfect Weight for your dog or cat.  Please read the full Terms & Conditions found on the entry form.[Tweet “win a 10-week supply of Science Diet Perfect Weight for your dog or cat. “]

health and wellness            health and wellness

Photos courtesy of Hill’s

Hill’s diets are available from your vet, favorite pet specialty store or online at Pet360.

If you have an Ask Dr. Anna question you would like answered, please post them in the comment section. Stay up to date on all the latest by subscribing to my blog.  Also “like” me on Facebook.

Dr. Anna was born and raised in Guthrie, Oklahoma. As a teenager, Dr. Anna found her beloved pet dead on the side of the road left to die without any help. That was the moment she decided to become a vet and vowed to help other people and their pets. After a few years of practicing in New Hampshire, Dr. Anna became homesick and decided to return to Guthrie to be with her parents and five other siblings. Family and friends are a major part of our lives which is why we treat our clients at Guthrie Pet Hospital as family.  Dr. Anna and her husband do not have children but are very proud pet parents and, therefore, treat every four-legged friend as part of the family.

Dog Training Tips: The Power of positive reinforcement.

Positive reinforcement

Training your dog is one of the most important things you can do with and for your canine companion. Positive reinforcement training can help to build a strong relationship between you and your dog, decrease the stress in the owner/dog relationship, and increase the happiness you and your dog experience together. No one wants an unruly, destructive, annoying dog, and your dog doesn’t want to live in an environment where he’s constantly in trouble.

 

Even knowing the importance of training for your dog, it can be hard to get started. There are so many different training techniques, tools, and equipment out there—it’s difficult to know where to start. After years of trying different approaches, I’ve settled on the Positive Reinforcement Method of dog training to get the best results with my dogs, as well as my positive reinforcementclients’ dogs.

There are a lot of people who don’t like the idea of what they consider “treat training” or positive reinforcement. They want their dog to respect them, work for them, and listen to them based solely on the fact that they (the owner) are the “alpha” or the “pack leader”. Imagine it this way, though…

You’ve been offered three identical jobs with equal pay:

Job A expects you to know exactly what is required of you when you walk in the door. When you get something wrong, you’re given a warning, your boss pokes you with a stick, and you’re told to try again. This happens over and over again until you get it right—then your boss tells you that you did a good job.

Job B expects you to know exactly what is required of you when you walk in the door. When you get something wrong, your boss ignores you. When you get something right, your boss gives you a penny.

Job C gives you on-the-job training. Your boss explains what is required of you, kindly tells you when you’ve done something the wrong way, and shows you how to do it the way it’s supposed to be done. When you get it right, you’re given a cash bonus.

Which job would you prefer to go to? Which boss would you rather work for? Which environment would be the most fulfilling? I know I’d choose Job C.

Some people believe that Positive Reinforcement training leads to a dog who will only work for food. In reality, a dog who learns to work by being rewarded is a dog who will happily work for the person who rewards him. He’ll be more willing to learn new behaviors when he knows that “getting it right” leads to a reward that he loves.

IMG_3574zStefani Fortney has loved dogs for as long as long as she can remember. At the age of nine, she and her little Beagle mix, Puppy, learned obedience together for the first time in 4-H. As an adult, Stefani became a professional groomer, then later earned her accreditation (ABCDT) as a dog trainer from Animal Behavior College. She uses Positive Reinforcement training techniques exclusively. Stefani currently shares her home with her wife (Melissa), six dogs (Phaedra, Spectre, Mani, Fritter, Poppy, and Opus), and one cat (Pudge).

 

If you have a question you would like answered, please post them in the comment section. Stay up to date on all the latest by subscribing to Ask Dr. Anna’s blog.  Also “like” Guthrie Pet Hospital on Facebook.

Lepto: What is it and how to protect you and your pet

Lepto

Lepto, which is short for Leptosporosis, is a potentially fatal bacterial infection that can affect humans and animals.    Lepto is commonly found in any water source, soil, and mud.  [Tweet “Lepto is a potentially fatal bacterial infection that can affect humans and animals. “]

Lepto is a common bacterial infection that is spread through the urine of infected animals.   Rats, mice, and other rodents are common carriers of Lepto and are usually the source of infection for dogs.  The urine from infected animals contaminates soil, food or water sources and can survive there for weeks to months.  The bacteria can then infect another animal or human from a cut in the skin, direct contact with eyes, nose or mouth, or from drinking the contaminated water.  Once an animal is infected, they can shed the bacteria in their urine for weeks to years.

Symptoms of Lepto:

Symptoms can appear 4-10 days after being exposed to the bacteria.

  • Fever
  • Lethargy
  • Anorexia
  • Jaundice/Icteric mucous membranes
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Abdominal pain
  • Some pets have no symptoms at all

Diagnosis of Lepto:

Your veterinarian may be suspicious of Lepto if your dog has any or all of the symptoms listed above and has elevated liver or kidney enzymes.  Diagnosis is confirmed by submitting blood or urine sample to an outside laboratory.  Antibody tests can help confirm your pet’s exposure to Lepto, but a positive PCR test is confirmation that the bacteria is present in your pet’s body.  Dr. Anna Coffin diagnoses several cases each year.  Lepto cases are more common during rainy seasons.

Treatment of Lepto:

Lepto is treatable with antibiotics.  It’s important to treat your pet with the full course of antibiotics (3-4 weeks) to prevent your pet from shedding Lepto in the urine for up to three months.  Many pets need supportive care with hospitalization and intravenous fluids until symptoms subside.  Since Lepto is contagious to people, it is imperative to avoid contact with contaminated urine.

Prevention of Lepto:

  1. It’s important to vaccinate your pet yearly for Lepto in endemic areas.  There areLepto many different strains of Lepto, and the vaccine does not protect against every strain. 
  2. Strict rodent control.
  3. Don’t swim or wade in water that might be contaminated with animal urine.
  4. Wear protective clothing when cleaning urine from infected animals.
  5. Disinfect contaminated surfaces.
  6. Remove stagnant water sources from the environment.

If you have an Ask Dr. Anna question you would like answered, please post them in the comment section. Stay up to date on all the latest by subscribing to my blog.  Also “like” me on Facebook.

Dr. Anna was born and raised in Guthrie, Oklahoma. As a teenager, Dr. Anna found her beloved pet dead on the side of the road left to die without any help. That was the moment she decided to become a vet and vowed to help other people and their pets. After a few years of practicing in New Hampshire, Dr. Anna became homesick and decided to return to Guthrie to be with her parents and five other siblings. Family and friends are a major part of our lives which is why we treat our clients at Guthrie Pet Hospital as family.  Dr. Anna and her husband do not have children but are very proud pet parents and, therefore, treat every four-legged friend as part of the family.

border decoration
border decoration