Posts from August, 2013

Fact vs. Fiction about Rabies from a Guthrie vet

Guthrie vet states the facts about Rabies.

Guthrie vet

 

This week’s article is brought to you by The Crazies.  The Crazies is an action packed, scary movie about a town that has been contaminated by Rabies.  The people in the town begin to develop symptoms and start killing one another.  In this week’s blog a Guthrie vet lists the top three misconceptions about Rabies that they used in this movie.

1.     Rabies is an airborne or water contagion.

Actually, Rabies is a contagious disease but is primarily transmitted from an infected animal via bite wounds.  Raccoons are the most common animal to be infected with Rabies in the United States.  Bats are the most common animal responsible for transmission to people in the United States.  Cats are the most common domestic animal infected with rabies in the United States but dogs are the most common world wide states a Guthrie vet.

2.     Symptoms include bloody nose and zombie-like activity.

Actually, many people associate Rabies with frothing from the mouth.  Although this is a symptom that can be seen, it is rare.  A Guthrie vet says symptoms in animals are usually a change in behavior, such as seeing a wild animal out during the day and being friendly.  Animals with Rabies can also appear sick, crazed or vicious.  Symptoms in people starts with pain and tingling at the bite wound and slowly progresses to fever, confusion, agitation and eventually death.

3.     Treatment involves shooting the infected person in the head.

Actually, treatment must be started before symptoms appear, which can occur from 10 to 60 days after the bite wound.   Immediate wound cleaning and treatment is very important.  A one-time injection of human rabies immune- globulin (or HRIG) provides rapid, short-term protection against rabies.  Long term protection is provided through a series of vaccines.

If you or your pet has been attacked by an animal that you think might have Rabies DO NOT shoot the animal in the head.  The only way to test for Rabies is to identify the virus in the brain tissue of the infected animal.  A Guthrie vet should remove the head and send it to your state health department.

Remember–Rabies is a virus that can affect any mammal and is 100% fatal once symptoms begin to develop.  Rabies, in humans, is rare in the U.S., with only 27 cases occurring since 1990.  Although rabies in humans is very rare in the United States, between 16,000 and 39,000 people receive preventive medical treatment each year after being exposed to a potentially rabid animal.

Anant N S (www.thelensor.tumblr.com) / Foter / CC BY-NC-ND

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Key Steps to Successful flea control by a Guthrie veterinary hospital

Guthrie veterinary hospital discusses flea control.

adult male Oropsylla Montana flea
kat m research / Foter / CC BY-SA

Did you know that a single flea can bite your pet 400 times a day, drink more than its body weight in blood and produce hundreds of eggs each day?  Besides causing skin and allergy issues fleas can transmit tapeworms to your pet. When you see fleas on your pet, you are only seeing 5% of their population. The other 95%, (consisting of eggs, larvae and pupae) are living in the environment, such as your carpet, couch and grass. Weather permitting, new adult fleas emerge every 2 weeks.  Here are some key steps to successful flea control from a Guthrie veterinary hospital.

The first step in flea control is getting them off your pets.  It is very important to make sure that you are treating all the pets in your household even if they aren’t showing any signs of discomfort from fleas.  The most effective method for flea control is purchasing a monthly product from your Guthrie veterinary hospital because over the counter flea control products are not as potent.  In fact, some of these over the counter flea products are even toxic if administered incorrectly or given to the wrong species.  This Guthrie veterinary hospital personally recommends a product called Comfortis.  This is an oral product that starts killing fleas in 30 minutes, they are all dead within 4 hours and it continues to work for 30 days.  It’s compounded from a natural substance that was found on beaches.  An even better product is Trifexus, which is Comfortis combined with a heartworm prevention.  However, it’s very important to make sure your pet has been heartworm tested before starting this product.

Once your pets have been treated it is important to treat your environment.  This is the hardest element of flea control.  It’s important to disrupt the flea life cycle so that the flea eggs, larvae and pupae don’t continue to develop into adult fleas.  The eggs, larvae and pupae live in dark or shady area of your house and yard.  It’s important to wash all pet bedding, vacuum carpets, especially under furniture and in closets, and wash area rugs. Treat your house and yard with an insecticide or better yet, hire a professional exterminator.

Fleas love hot and humid weather which is exactly what we are experiencing here at a Guthrie veterinary hospital.  So be proactive and treat your pets and their environment before a medical condition arises.  If you pet is itching or has hair loss take them to your veterinarian and get them some relief.

Dr. Anna was born and raised in Guthrie, Oklahoma.  As a teenager, Dr. Anna found her beloved pet dead on the side of the road left to die without any help.  That was the moment she decided to become a vet and vowed to help other people and their pets.  After a few years of practicing in New Hampshire, Dr. Anna became homesick and decided to return to Guthrie to be with her parents and five other siblings.  Family and friends are a major part of our lives which is why we treat our clients as family.  Dr. Anna and her husband do not have children but our very proud pet parents and therefore, treat every four legged friend as part of the family.

Ticks can transmit diseases to dogs and people by a Guthrie veterinarian

A Guthrie veterinarian warns about tick transmitted diseases.

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graftedno1 / Foter / CC BY-ND

Ticks can transmit diseases to dogs and people.  In fact, the CDC has reported that ticks in every U.S. state carry diseases and that the number of tick-borne diseases is increasing.  A Guthrie veterinarian can testify to that as we are seeing more dogs than ever with tick transmitted diseases.  A simple blood test is available that can that check for heartworms and six tick transmitted diseases.

There are several different species of ticks found in the United States.  The Lone Star tick commonly infests dogs, cats and people.  It primarily lives in wooded areas and this tick will not tolerate low humidity.  The deer tick or black-legged tick transmits Lyme disease and is found in the eastern United States, but is not present in the South.  The brown dog tick is unique because it can survive in low humidity environments, like your house, and survive for generations.  This is one good reason to provide year around protection for your pets states a Guthrie veterinarian.

What’s the best way to remove a tick?  Grasp the tick close to the skin as possible with a pair of tweezers and pull the body out with a steady motion.  Dispose of the tick by placing it in alcohol or flushing it down the toilet.  Many people claim that you can remove a tick with a lit match, fingernail polish or petroleum jelly.  However, none of these methods work and in fact these methods can actually result in the tick releasing more disease carrying saliva into the wound which increases the risk of infection.

There are many different monthly medications that are available for treatment of ticks.  If you have seen ticks on your pets, visit a Guthrie veterinarian and have them tested and pick up some preventative medicine.

Dr. Anna was born and raised in Guthrie, Oklahoma.  As a teenager, Dr. Anna found her beloved pet dead on the side of the road left to die without any help.  That was the moment she decided to become a vet and vowed to help other people and their pets.  After a few years of practicing in New Hampshire, Dr. Anna became homesick and decided to return to Guthrie to be with her parents and five other siblings.  Family and friends are a major part of our lives which is why we treat our clients as family.  Dr. Anna and her husband do not have children but our very proud pet parents and therefore, treat every four legged friend as part of the family.

 

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