Posts Tagged: Cat

National Cat Day: What’s It Really All About?

cat

 

 

 

By Stacey Frazier October 29th is National Cat Day, or as my cats like to think of it, National Cat World Domination Day. Or maybe National It’s My World You Are Lucky I Let You Live In It Day. It is supposed to be a day we focus on the nearly 4 million cats that are taken in by shelters annually and how we can reduce that number and make their lives better. My cats think it should be the day I think about how to make THEIR lives better. This year they actually sent me a list. Continue…

Domestic cat – it’s origins and history.

The domestic cat

Today is National Cat Day!  In honor of them, I will discuss the origins of the domestic cat.

The first archaeological records of the domestic cat dates back 10,000 years ago to Cyrus where a cat was found buried with a human.  In fact, it’s been proven from genetic research that all cats descended from the Middle Eastern wildcat, Felis sylvestris, which literally means “cat of the woods.”

Many researchers believe that the domestic cat actually domesticated itself about 12,000 years ago when the first agricultural societies began to establish themselves in the Middle East Fertile Crescent.   When humans began to settle down and began to grow and store crops, mice became a problem and cats just wondered onto the scene and into our homes.

In ancient Egypt, cats were revered by the gods and as gods.  Killing at cat in ancient Egypt was often a death sentence to the offender.  Interestingly, a cemetery was found in Beni-Hassan brimming with 300,000 cat mummies.

Unfortunately, cats became associated with witches in the Middle Ages and were often viewed as demons.  This lead to the killing of many cats in an attempt to ward off evil.  Many scientist feel that this may have been what precipitated and perpetuated The Plague.  Finally, in the 1600s the public image of cats began to change and now domestic cats are the most popular house pets in the United States with almost 75 million as household pets.

I would love to hear from you, so please share your comments and questions.  If you have an Ask Dr. Anna question you would like answered, please post them in the comments. Stay up to date on all the latest by subscribing to my blog.  Also “like” me on Facebook.

Dr. Anna was born and raised in Guthrie, Oklahoma. As a teenager, Dr. Anna found her beloved pet dead on the side of the road left to die without any help. That was the moment she decided to become a vet and vowed to help other people and their pets. After a few years of practicing in New Hampshire, Dr. Anna became homesick and decided to return to Guthrie to be with her parents and five other siblings. Family and friends are a major part of our lives which is why we treat our clients as family. Dr. Anna and her husband do not have children but are very proud pet parents and therefore, treat every four legged friend as part of the family.

Guthrie vet clinic lets the cat out of the bag!

Guthrie vet clinic lets cat out of bag about vaccines

Guthrie vet clinic spills the beans and tells all about cat vaccines.  What are they and which ones do you need?

This is the seventh part of a Guthrie vet wants to take you on a journeyEver wonder what all those initials (DHLPP, FVRCP) meant at the Guthrie vet clinic when you go to get your pet vaccinated? Well, it’s quite simple; each letter stands for a disease that is contained within the vaccine. This week a Guthrie vet clinic will talk about cat vaccines. The annual vaccines for your cat are FVRCP, also commonly called feline distemper,  leukemia and Rabies. Here is what they each stand for:

1.  FVR stands for feline viral rhinotracheitis:  Rhinotracheitis is caused by a virus transmitted through the air.  Clinical signs include fever, sneezing, coughing, nasal discharge, and eye discharge.

2.  C stands for Calicivirus and Chlamydia.  Calicivirus  is transmitted in saliva. It is a very hardy virus which is easily transmitted.  Clinical signs include fever, anorexia, oral ulcers, and clear nasal discharge.   Chlamydia is caused by a bacteria that is transmitted in saliva. Clinical signs include squinting, congestion, weepy eyes, sneezing, and a clear nasal discharge.

3.  P stand for Panleukopenia:  Panleukopenia also known as  feline distemper is caused by a virus that is shed in body secretions. Clinical signs include decreased white blood cells count, high fever, anorexia, vomiting, green gooey diarrhea, and dehydration. This infection is most common in young kittens and is an often a fatal disease even in adult cats with no prior exposure.

4.  Leukemia:  Feline leukemia is a virus that suppresses the cat’s immune system. It can eventually cause leukemia, lymphoma, decreased red blood cell count, or reproductive disorders.  Symptoms include chronic mouth and gum infections, skin and ear infections, chronic respiratory disease, vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia and dehydration.  Feline leukemia is transmitted through blood or saliva primarily through cat bites.  It can also be passed from mothers to kittens in utero. The virus does not survive long outside a host and is easily killed by drying or cleaning.  Guthrie vet clinics only recommend this vaccine if your cat goes outside or is exposed to other cats that go outside.

5.  Rabies: Rabies is 100% fatal disease and is caused by a virus. The virus is only transmitted from the bite of another animal that is infected with the rabies virus. Symptoms can include sudden death, drastic changes in behavior and neurological symptoms. This disease is also contagious to humans and is 100% fatal.  

Don’t let your cat out of the bag and get sick from these preventable diseases.  Call your Guthrie vet clinic for an appointment today.

I would love to hear from you, so please share your comments and questions.  If you have an Ask Dr. Anna question you’d like answered, please post them in the comments. Stay up to date on all the latest by subscribing to my blog.  Also “like” me on Facebook,

Dr. Anna was born and raised in Guthrie, Oklahoma. As a teenager, Dr. Anna found her beloved pet dead on the side of the road left to die without any help. That was the moment she decided to become a vet and vowed to help other people and their pets. After a few years of practicing in New Hampshire, Dr. Anna became homesick and decided to return to Guthrie to be with her parents and five other siblings. Family and friends are a major part of our lives which is why we treat our clients as family. Dr. Anna and her husband do not have children but our very proud pet parents and therefore, treat every four legged friend as part of the family.

Photo by:  Andrea Schaffer

Is Your Cat Weird? Deciphering Cat Behavior

cat behavior

A Guthrie veterinarian discusses weird but normal cat behavior.  

Ever wonder if your cat is weird?  I think I have most of you beat on this question as our clinic cat, Sylvie, sucks on the end of her tail.  In all likelihood, what you think is a strange cat behavior is probably normal for most cats.  Today, a Guthrie veterinarian will discuss some common normal cat behavior in cats and explain why they do what they do. Continue…

Protect Your Pet From Pet Flipping From A Guthrie Veterinary!

 

Have you heard of pet flipping?  Pet flipping is a new trend where people are stealing dogs and selling them on the internet or using them for breeding purposes.  Unfortunately, this has been reported around the country from pet owners and law enforcement officials.  You can protect your pet from this horrible ordeal by micro-chipping your pet and by making sure your online contact information is correct.  Also, if you purchase a pet online a Guthrie veterinary recommends taking the pet to your veterinarian or an animal shelter to have it scanned for a microchip.  August 15th is National Check the Chip Day. Continue…

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