Posts Tagged: Guthrie vet

Guthrie vet wants to take you on a journey.

Journey

Personal journey of Guthrie vet takes her back to grassroots of veterinary medicine.

This past year I have been plagued with chronic migraines that have led me to many different doctor’s offices for diagnosis and treatment.  Not only has this journey taught me to be a more compassionate and caring person but it has also taught me the importance of communication between doctor and patient.  

While flipping through a veterinary magazine I came across some statistics that shocked me about my own clients.  In a recent pet owner survey,  only 57% of pet owners believe that their veterinarian communicates in a manner they understand.  Only 44% of pet owners agree that their veterinarian clearly explained why their pet should be seen again.  I’m almost embarrassed to say that many pet owners often leave appointments without even realizing a physical exam even took place.

This is a journey through a series of blogs that will walk you through the steps of vising a veterinarian for annual vaccines.  Why, preventative medicine?  Preventative medicine is the backbone to a healthy, longer living pet.   It allows a Guthrie vet to detect any hidden illnesses which could otherwise go untreated and have serious consequences.  In this series I will discuss 5 key steps that will lead you and your pet toward a healthy, happier lifestyle.                                                                                                               Vaccines

  • History                                            
  • Physical Exam                                                                   
  • Testing
  • Vaccines
  • Preventative medication

I’m looking forward to guiding you through this important part of veterinary medicine.  Check back next week for the next portion of the preventative medicine series where I will discuss why we ask all those annoying questions before the exam. 

BTW, if you haven’t been to see this Guthrie vet, call us to set up an appointment so we can be sure everything is A-OK!

I would love to hear from you, so please share your comments and questions.  If you have an Ask Dr. Anna question you’d like answered, please post them in the comments. Stay up to date on all the latest by subscribing to my blog.  Also “like” me on Facebook,

Dr. Anna was born and raised in Guthrie, Oklahoma. As a teenager, Dr. Anna found her beloved pet dead on the side of the road left to die without any help. That was the moment she decided to become a vet and vowed to help other people and their pets. After a few years of practicing in New Hampshire, Dr. Anna became homesick and decided to return to Guthrie to be with her parents and five other siblings. Family and friends are a major part of our lives which is why we treat our clients as family. Dr. Anna and her husband do not have children but our very proud pet parents and therefore, treat every four legged friend as part of the family.

photo credit:  Manoj Kengudelu

 

A Guthrie vet discusses how to select pet food.

Twilight Werewolf Kibble Recipe Labels

A Guthrie vet discusses how to understand pet food nutritional statements and select a good pet food brand.

All pet food diets have to meet specific standards set up by the Association of American Feed Controls Officials (AAFCO) to be able to manufacture and sell within the United States.  A Guthrie vet says that all pet foods must be complete and balanced and it must specify for a life cycle the food is intended to be feed.  These two items and reading the AAFCO label are far more important than looking at the actual ingredients.  Ingredients are important but you must realize that not all ingredients can be utilized by pets as in people.

There are three ways for a diet to be declared complete and balanced.  Laboratory analysis on the actual pet food, a mathematical calculation based on nutritional information or a feeding trial where the food is fed to animals over a period of time.  Just because a diet has been formulated and says it is complete and balanced doesn’t guarantee that the pet is benefiting from the ingredients.  A Guthrie vet says the best foods to feed are foods that have been determined complete and balanced by a feeding trial!  The method of determination is always stated on the AAFCO statement which is somewhere on the bag.

The second important aspect is to determine which life cycle category is appropriate for your pet and to feed that type of food.  The four life stages that have been determined by AAFCO are adult (maintenance), growth (puppy/kitten), reproduction (pregnant animals) and all life stages.  There is no profile for senior or geriatric patients that has been determined by AAFCO.  Food that is labeled senior/geriatric is a gimmick used for marketing terms.  Many dog foods fall into the all life stages category, which means that it is appropriate for all stages.  These foods have to meet higher requirements in order to sustain the growing and pregnant animals and therefore contain more than needed for an adult animal.  A Guthrie vet says it’s better to tailor the food to each individual animal based on their actual life stage and feed for growth, maintenance or reproduction instead of all life stages.

Here are a few other facts by a Guthrie vet to keep in mind.  I know a lot of people switch brands of foods, so if you do this it is important to feed according to the guild lines on the bag of food because calorie content can vary 200-300 kcal/cup between different diets.  It’s best to feed according to the guild lines on the bag of food.  The amount listed is a range that is to be feed per day.  I also recommend staying away from pet foods containing dyes as these serve no nutritional value for your pet and only makes the product look more appealing to us fur parents. There is no documented health benefits to feeding a grain free diet.  Grain free does not mean that it is low in carbohydrates.  These diets are usually substituting a lower quality carbohydrate to meet energy requirements.  All natural is not the same as organic.  To be listed as organic there are very strict guild lines that have to be met.  There are over 50 dog and cat food products currently on recall lists, so please check the AVMA website for a current list of recalled products.  If you store your food in another container always keep the product code and lot number of the food for recall purposes.

Dr. Anna was born and raised in Guthrie, Oklahoma.  As a teenager, Dr. Anna found her beloved pet dead on the side of the road left to die without any help.  That was the moment she decided to become a vet and vowed to help other people and their pets.  After a few years of practicing in New Hampshire, Dr. Anna became homesick and decided to return to Guthrie to be with her parents and five other siblings.  Family and friends are a major part of our lives which is why we treat our clients as family.  Dr. Anna and her husband do not have children but our very proud pet parents and therefore, treat every four-legged friend as part of the family.

Fact vs. Fiction about Rabies from a Guthrie vet

Guthrie vet states the facts about Rabies.

Guthrie vet

 

This week’s article is brought to you by The Crazies.  The Crazies is an action packed, scary movie about a town that has been contaminated by Rabies.  The people in the town begin to develop symptoms and start killing one another.  In this week’s blog a Guthrie vet lists the top three misconceptions about Rabies that they used in this movie.

1.     Rabies is an airborne or water contagion.

Actually, Rabies is a contagious disease but is primarily transmitted from an infected animal via bite wounds.  Raccoons are the most common animal to be infected with Rabies in the United States.  Bats are the most common animal responsible for transmission to people in the United States.  Cats are the most common domestic animal infected with rabies in the United States but dogs are the most common world wide states a Guthrie vet.

2.     Symptoms include bloody nose and zombie-like activity.

Actually, many people associate Rabies with frothing from the mouth.  Although this is a symptom that can be seen, it is rare.  A Guthrie vet says symptoms in animals are usually a change in behavior, such as seeing a wild animal out during the day and being friendly.  Animals with Rabies can also appear sick, crazed or vicious.  Symptoms in people starts with pain and tingling at the bite wound and slowly progresses to fever, confusion, agitation and eventually death.

3.     Treatment involves shooting the infected person in the head.

Actually, treatment must be started before symptoms appear, which can occur from 10 to 60 days after the bite wound.   Immediate wound cleaning and treatment is very important.  A one-time injection of human rabies immune- globulin (or HRIG) provides rapid, short-term protection against rabies.  Long term protection is provided through a series of vaccines.

If you or your pet has been attacked by an animal that you think might have Rabies DO NOT shoot the animal in the head.  The only way to test for Rabies is to identify the virus in the brain tissue of the infected animal.  A Guthrie vet should remove the head and send it to your state health department.

Remember–Rabies is a virus that can affect any mammal and is 100% fatal once symptoms begin to develop.  Rabies, in humans, is rare in the U.S., with only 27 cases occurring since 1990.  Although rabies in humans is very rare in the United States, between 16,000 and 39,000 people receive preventive medical treatment each year after being exposed to a potentially rabid animal.

Anant N S (www.thelensor.tumblr.com) / Foter / CC BY-NC-ND

Photo credit:

 

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