Posts Tagged: tick diseases

3 tick diseases you need to protect your pet against #Seresto

tick diseases

Ticks commonly transmit diseases to dogs and cats here in Guthrie, OK.   Find out more about the 3 common tick diseases we diagnose and treat here at Guthrie Pet Hospital.

In the picture above, you are able to get a good look at the mouth part of the tick which acts like a tiny harpoon.  It is able to anchor itself into your pet’s skin.  Once attached, it releases an anticoagulant to prevent clotting and to allow it to continue to feed of your pet’s blood.  The feeding time required to allow disease transmission varies between tick diseases.

Ehrlichia species:

  • According to the Companion Animal Parasite Council (CAPC) 1 out of every 34 dogs in the United States test positive for Ehrlichiosis.   The risk of infection with these tick diseases in Guthrie, Oklahoma is high.  Here at Guthrie Pet Hospital, this is the most common tick transmitted disease that we diagnose and treat.
  • Common symptoms include fever, lethargy, not eating and weight loss.  Guthrie veterinarians may find enlarged lymph nodes and signs of hemorrhaging.  Occasionally dogs will have vomiting, diarrhea and neurological symptoms. 

Anaplasma species:

  • According to the Companion Animal Parasite Council (CAPC) 1 out of every 33 dogs in the United States test positive for Anaplasmosis.  The risk of infection with these tick disease in Guthrie, Oklahoma is moderate.
  • Common symptoms include fever, lethargy, not eating and weight loss.  Guthrie veterinarians may find enlarged lymph nodes and signs of hemorrhaging.  Occasionally dogs will have vomiting, diarrhea and neurological symptoms. 

Cytauxzoon felis:

  • This tick transmitted disease is also known as Bob Cat Fever because the bobcat is the main reservoir for this organism. 
  • Most cases of feline cytauxzoonosis in the United States are reported from the southeastern and south-central states between March and September.  Here at Guthrie Pet Hospital we diagnose several cases in cats each year.
  • Cats with cytauxzoonosis may present with high fever, dyspnea, depression, dehydration, anorexia, anemia, and jaundice that often rapidly progresses to hypothermia, coma, and death.
  • Over 50% of cats infected with this organism die!

The best way to avoid these deadly tick diseases is to prevent them.  Here are some measures you can take to help protect your pet and prevent these tick diseases.

  • Avoid tick infested areas
  • Modify the habitat around your home by removing debris and keeping shrubbery and grass clipped closely.
  • Daily tick checks to remove any attached tick as soon as possible
  • Routine application of products that kill and repel ticks.

There are so many options available today for flea and tick prevention ranging from shampoos, dips, collars, topical applications and oral medication.  A new flea and tick collar stands out above all the rest …  The Seresto collar [Tweet “A new flea and tick collar stands out above all the rest … The Seresto collar “]

tick diseasestick diseases

  • The topical alternative for flea and tick control that lasts 8 months.
  • If a tick is repelled or killed it can’t attach and transmit the organisms that cause disease.
  • Consumers voted Seresto for dogs the best new flea and tick control of 2014.
  • Get a $20 rebate on your qualifying Seresto purchase.

For more information on this topic:  Amazing new aid in flea and tick prevention #Seresto

This post is sponsored by Bayer / Seresto and the Pet Blogger Network. I am being compensated for helping spread the word about the Seresto product, but Dr. Anna only shares information she feel is relevant to our readers. Bayer / Seresto is not responsible for the content of this article.

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Dr. Anna was born and raised in Guthrie, Oklahoma. As a teenager, Dr. Anna found her beloved pet dead on the side of the road left to die without any help. That was the moment she decided to become a vet and vowed to help other people and their pets. After a few years of practicing in New Hampshire, Dr. Anna became homesick and decided to return to Guthrie to be with her parents and five other siblings. Family and friends are a major part of our lives which is why we treat our clients at Guthrie Pet Hospital as family.  Dr. Anna and her husband do not have children but are very proud pet parents and therefore, treat every four legged friend as part of the family.

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